Bretons, Basques and Inuit in Labrador and Northern Newfoundland: the Control of Maritime Resources in the 16th and 17th Centuries

Prof. dr. Peter Pope, Memorial university, Newfoundland, Canada

The paper would address a complex issue in the ethnohistory of resource exploitation on the coasts of Labrador and northern Newfoundland. Europeans developed a seasonal salt-cod fishery on the coasts of northern Newfoundland and southern Labrador, in almost exactly the same period that the Inuit were moving southwards along the Labrador coast, from the north. While we have evidence for French and Basque exploitation of Labrador in the 16th century (by both fishers and, later, whalers), Europeans seem to have been absent from that coast through most of the 17th century, until the turn of the 18th century when Canadian merchants based in Quebec began to exploit the Labrador Straits for salmon and seals. This absence coincides with a long-running guerrilla war, waged by the Inuit against the Breton and Norman fishers exploiting Newfoundland's Petit Nord. This context of conflict suggests that the movement of Inuit into southern Labrador by the end of the 16th century motivated European fishers to avoid the Labrador coast through most of the 17th century. These conflicts did not really end until the establishment of a Moravian mission in northern Labrador, following the fall of New France in 1763.

John Mason's Map of Newfoundland, 1625
Willem Barentsz Poolinstituut

Bundeling van kennis, onderzoek en onderwijs over de Noord- en de Zuidpool

home

organisatie

onderzoek

onderwijs

symposia

informatie voor ...

nieuws

APECS-NL

rothera

SEES.NL

sitemap

contact


ijsbeersymposium

national polar symposium 2013

2nd APECS BeNeLux symposium

symposium Louwrens Hacquebord

xxxxsymposium report

mini symposium 2012

symposium 2011

symposium 2010

symposium 2009



 

no translation
available

 


email:

password:

Volg ons op