Past changes in global ice volume: What can we learn from deep-ocean sediment cores and ice-sheet models

By drs. B. de Boer
KNMI, TUD

Knowledge on past climate change largely emerges from sediment records drilled from the ocean floor and ice-core records from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. From these records proxy data is obtained indicating changes in, for example, temperature, sea level and greenhouse gas concentrations. During the Pliocene and Pleistocene (from 5 million years ago to present) the climate was characterised by strong variability in both sea level and temperature. On this time scale, the changes in sea level are dominated by changes of ice volume on land. Predominantly by the waxing and waning of large ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the separate contributions of ice on both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere are not precisely known. In this talk a short introduction will be given on paleoglaciology and how to interpret proxy records of sea level and temperature. We used 3-D ice-sheet models to simulate past ice volume variations of all major ice sheets on Earth, and to derive the separate contributions of each ice sheet to total sea level over the past millions of years.
Willem Barentsz Poolinstituut

Bundeling van kennis, onderzoek en onderwijs over de Noord- en de Zuidpool

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